Universal Design India Principles

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Co-authors:
Abir Mullick, Anjlee Agarwal, Balaram S., Debkumar Chakrabarti, Gaurav Raheja, Haimanti Banerjee, Rachna Khare, Ravi Shankar and Shivani Gupta (In alphabetical order)

Copyright:
National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad

Disclaimer:
1. The UDI principles are stand alone universal design ideologies that  focus in Indianness and inclusivity as they relate to age, gender, disability, caste, class, religion, poverty and urban/rural background.
2. UDI principles neither make any connection nor build on the 7 Universal Design Principles. They recognize the overarching importance 7 Principles in the field of universal design.


Principles, Description and Guidelines (in Indian context):

1.     Equitable/ Saman : The design is fair and non-discriminating to diverse users
  • Avoid prejudices against people of all ages, gender, disability, sizes, caste, class and religion.
  • Consider different capabilities of users and build in many levels of engagement.
  • Provide choices in access and use thru flexibility and customization.
  • Allow personalization through inclusion of adjustable and adaptable options.
  • Provide equality in challenge, opportunity and energy requirement.
2.     Usable/ Sahaj : The design is operable by all users
  • Provide independence, comfort, safety and support during use.
  • Facilitate access, operation and convenience by diverse users.
  • Include adaptations for those experiencing difficulty in use.
  • Provide clarity in use, operation and maintenance to minimize instruction and avoid confusion and error.
  • Adopt simple means to overcome complex operation.
  • Follow cultural norms to address user expectations.
  • Offer multi-sensory feedback to point in the right direction.  
  • Build in intuitive operation and innate understanding of problem.
  • Allow easy adaptation to facilitate use by people with diverse abilities.
  • Prevent costly mistakes and untended consequence from misuse.
3.     Cultural / Sanskritik : The design respects the cultural past & the changing present assist all users
  • Maintain social and traditional qualities in design.
  • Include Indian idioms to make historic and social connection.
  • Present in many languages for inclusive comprehension.
  • For all castes and society levels.
  • Respond to local context and conditions.
  • Employ appropriate technology to match user expectations.
4.     Economy/ Sasta : The design respects affordability and cost considerations for diverse users
  • Ensure affordability, durability and maintainability.
  • Use local materials for energy savings and cost effectiveness.
  • Focus on low unit cost through wide distribution.
  • Adopt modular approach to offer choice in features and price range.
5.     Aesthetics/ Sundar : The design employs aesthetic to promote social integration among users
  • Employ aesthetic to enhance universal appeal and use.
  • Allow personalizing aesthetics through flexibility, adaptability and modularity of colour, form, texture and interaction.
  • Employ appearance to inform use and safety.
  • Bridge wide range of meaning and comprehension gaps.

 

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